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Forum for Epiphytic Myrmecophytes

Frank

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  1. In 2017 I received a packet of seeds labeled as Anthorrhiza caerulea. I sowed them and got good germination. There was some variation in the seedlings and young plants but all were making large asymmetrically branched spines on both the caudex and stem - what was not to like about that! In 2018 and 2019 I sold some of the plants on the American eBay using the name on the seed packet, Anthorrhiza caerulea. "Caerulea" is derived from a Latin word meaning blue in reference to the fact that this species has beautiful blue flowers. My first plant bloomed in September of 2020 and is pictur
  2. Frank

    2021 FORUM DONORS

    Thank you very much to all who have contributed to the funding of our forum in the previous years! AS TO THIS YEAR, 2021: Every time I sign on to our forum the first thing I check is who is currently online. Over 90% of the viewers are "guests". Many of our original and early members have left or visit only occasionally. This is not really a surprise; there has always been an "ebb and flow" to what group of plants are popular and being sought out in any given year. The "tide is clearly out" on ant-plants right now. There are thousand of books and websites for orchi
  3. frogsintn3, The third photo in your posting above is not a M erinacea - The leaf shape is drastically wrong and there needs to be branched spines on the caudex.
  4. Hi Anita, welcome to the forum. Why don't you gather a little more information on this. Perhaps use a single-edge razor blade to cut the raised area in several different directions and see if they are solid or if there are perhaps insect larvae inside. Are new ones forming constantly or did the plant come with a certain number and they are not increasing? You may want to do a precautionary spray for bugs, something like safer's insecticidal soap - especially lf more leaves are getting the deformation since you got the plant. If it is not showing up on new, previous uninfected leaves you
  5. Hi Ladislav, The other 3 plants in the case look good, are you treating this new one the same as those or different? What do you mean by "dew"? Does that mean you only mist the plant and do not saturate the growing media with water? Does the growing media for this sick plant have sphagnum in it or is it all bark pieces? I see the droopy leaves as either a lack of watering or as a fungus causing rot in the stem or caudex. If you have not given the plant a good watering yet - as in set the pot in a bucket of water for a few hours so the bark or sphagnum can fully absorb
  6. What do I use for a growing media for Rubiaceous ant-plants you ask! The answer has changed many times over the years. What I am currently growing with is about: 33% long fiber sphagnum 27 % triple washed coconut husk chips 20% #3 perlite 15% Growstone, GS-2, for aeration 5% charcoal chips And for larger plants in larger pots I add about 5 to 10 % of Hydroton - baked clay pellets that are round and red. Now, for the finer details: SPHAGNUM The long fiber sphagnum has to be very good quality. The one I use now is a
  7. Hi Derrick, The link you just put in the above post is not taking us to any information about M. horrida. You may want to fine tune the link. As to updating your e-book, I suggest you keep people up to date by posting notes as as you proceed to build your magnificent work in the folder just below this one titled: "Derrick Rowe's ant plant e-book has just been released!!! and is available on our forum for free". Or as an alternative you could put notes about the changes to your e-book in the folder: "Ant plants - general information, literature and links" in the thread titled: "Now ava
  8. I have been studying and growing Rubiaceous ant-plants for 20 years now and there have been lots of exciting developments during that time. Arguably one of the best developments was getting Squamellarias into cultivation! Wow! And then that introduction gets followed up with the fabulous work of Dr. Guillaume Chomicki uncovering the complex symbiosis some of the Squamellarias have with Philidris nagasau ants that has the ants "farming" the plants. The ants "plant" the seeds, protect them and fertilize them (feces in the warted chamber of the seedlings). The plants, for their part in the
  9. Hi, Frank the administrator here, I ran Ezhikovich's posting thru google translate (Russian) and this is how it came out. Some of our people want to take a shot at a possible answer for this person? Hello! Half of my plants began to deform their new leaves, and the old leaves began to curl. They grow in different conditions of humidity and temperature, some on the windowsill, and others in the orchidaria. No pests, fertilizers use Osmokot. What could be the problem? I would be grateful for your suggestions.
  10. Science News, a bimonthly magazine about science topics, in it's April 25, 2020 issue has a 5 page article about various ants who have been cultivating plants and fungi; saying that they "may be the first known animals other than human to farm plants". The first page of the article stars the Philidris nagasau ants that plant Squamellaria seeds in the bark of trees on Fiji, protect the seedlings and adult plants, fertilize them with their feces and occupy the plants by living in the chambers in the caudex. None of this is new to us as Science News got all of this from Susan Renner and Guillau
  11. Do not leave here today without seeing Aurelien's great posting about the new greenhouse in Nancy, France. It is a FANTASTIC PHOTO TOUR! Look for it in the "Ant Plants in Cultivation" section.
  12. Hi Tommy, Welcome to the forum. We hope you find the information here useful in your plant hobby. Growing ant-plants mounted requires more effort and diligence than growing in pots and is best attempted only when you have a high humidity growing area, say 75% and over. Your plant and the overall planting look very good. The mass of sphagnum is essential in this way of growing and you need to keep the moss constantly wet, or at least moist. This is what make this way of growing more high maintenance compared to pots. The yellowing and loss of lower leaves is not unusual when
  13. Hi George, Welcome to the forum. We hope you find a lot of useful and interesting information here. Thanks for joining us. As to your H. puffii - you are right to be concerned - the shrinking of the caudex is not a good sign. (A caudex is a swollen stem base -- a bulb is like an onion, a collection of closely wrapped leaves) . When you say "soil" we hope you do not mean soil as in what you plant a garden or regular houseplant in. These ant- plants are epiphytes - plants that live on the surface of another plant so their roots will die if they are planted in normal garden-li
  14. Hi Bern, I grew it in a greenhouse in Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA for about 7 years. It started out as a cutting on a piece of tree fern. When that started growing off the tree fern I nailed that to a tree trunk in the main conservatory and it has grown up that trunk about 8 feet. It has always had some of the bullate leaves but it has not flowered there. I know it got regular fertilizer, but I cannot say that it ever grew vigorously for me - perhaps that is why no flowers.
  15. Fantastic Piece Jay !!!! Just great! I can't get over how good your photos are. Beautiful flowers. The step by step instructions and photos for building that display are priceless. You know a lot of us are going to have a go at it ourselves! Thank you for your continuing support of the forum both monetarily and with your exciting and insightful posts. We appreciate you sharing so generously with us!!! Frank
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