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Solanopteris brunei - from Colombia - Info:


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Yes..,

Costarica:(*Pejibaye distritto - *Siquirres "canton volcan Arenal)

 

and Panama:*Chiriqui cocle;

 

*Elevation 200 maximum 1400

 

Info:" tubercles secrete ecdisona hormone that help the growth of the ants.. "in Costa Rica there is  Azteca sp"., but Waner have been  identified as Azteca traili  

var.filicis forel, a specie not previously reported from Costa Rica but known from *Peru, definitively the presence of a South American insect at the nothermost

range of patato fern implie that the ferns and ants ahve coevolved ot only byological but also geographically;

  (there are....*Colombia - *Costa Rica - *Ecuador - *Panama - *Peru -)

    

Fiendly

Raffaele Ferraro

 
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Yes..,

Costarica:(*Pejibaye distritto - *Siquirres "canton volcan Arenal)

 

and Panama:*Chiriqui cocle;

 

*Elevation 200 maximum 1400

 

Info:" tubercles secrete ecdisona hormone that help the growth of the ants.. "in Costa Rica there is  Azteca sp"., but Waner have been  identified as Azteca traili  

var.filicis forel, a specie not previously reported from Costa Rica but known from *Peru, definitively the presence of a South American insect at the nothermost

range of patato fern implie that the ferns and ants ahve coevolved ot only byological but also geographically;

  (there are....*Colombia - *Costa Rica - *Ecuador - *Panama - *Peru -)

    

Fiendly

Raffaele Ferraro

 

 

 

 

Which species did you find - S. brunei or other species?

 

All the best

Andreas

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This is the "unknown" sp. It was published about 12 years ago.

http://www.botanicus.org/primeocr/mbgserv14/botanicus5/b13058551/31753003431209/31753003431209_0481.txt

Microgramma fosteri Leon & Beltran (sub-genus Solanopteris) published in Novon 12(4), 2002. Description:  a species with

dimorphic leaves, long creeping rhizomes and hollow tubers measuring only 1.5- 2 cm in diameter.  It differs from other

coenosoric (a particular sori shape) species by the presence of laminar scales intermixed among sori (spore receptacles)and

slender paraphyses (sterile plant organs) with elongate apical cells possessing clear lumina and thin walls.

Habitat/Range: As one can see from the above date, it is a 'relatively' new find.  The type specimen was collected in the

year 2000 in the Ucayali Region of north-central Peru on the Azul del Biabo(Blue Mountain Range), at an altitude of 1220 m.

(4003 ft.) in the cabaceras del Rio Pisque (headwaters of the River Pisque) which eventually flows to the Pacific Ocean

through Uruguay to the north west. The whole of the Blue Mountain Range is located on an isolated branch of the eastern

cordillera, spread between the geopolitical regions of Huánuco, Loreto, Ucayali and San Martin.  Created in 2001 it forms

Azul National Forest the largest continually intact high montane forests in Peru and the country’s third largest national

park. Its climate is influenced by its latitude and proximity to the inter-tropical convergence zone and altitudes that vary

from a high 2,320 m. (7612 ft.) down to only 150 m (492 ft.)  It is generally mild and rainy in areas above 400 m (1312 ft.)

but hot and humid on the Amazon lowland plain. At heights of 1220 m. (4003 ft.) and above, expect conditions to be cool and

wet, yet the entire region is subject to a pattern of dry periods between Jun/Jul to Oct/Nov.  There can also be occasional

cold winds from frigid mountains to the south known locally as "friaje" when temperatures will drop to as low as 8°C.

(46°F.)for several days. The highest mountains to the north and east of the Cordillera Azul constitute a barrier to humidity

from the Amazon plain to the east; therefore, in the northeast of the park, forests are markedly drier at varying altitudes.

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Here are some photos of a plant I grew as Solanopteris brunei.  I found it needed high humidity and would only make the modified stem tubers when it was getting very good light.  The plants would grow well for a while but eventually weaken and need to be restarted from cuttings

post-22-0-13485000-1392504581_thumb.jpg

post-22-0-90666700-1392504599_thumb.jpg

post-22-0-01514200-1392504609_thumb.jpg

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Thanks Andreas,  I grow them in large terrariums with a room humidifier inside running all day long on a low setting. Humidity stays about 80%. A muffin fan moves air, again only during the day. A half inch offset to the glass lid on one end to vent. They are in my basement so night time temperatures drop to 59 winter or about 63/65 summer.  I have never checked day time temperatures in the terrarium but with the lights outside the glass top I doubt if it gets above low 80s at the most.

 

The turning point to having them thrive was when I went to a very complex, homemade epiphyte mix for them.  Something around 40% long fiber sphagnum, about 20% coconut husk pieces (soaked 3 different times to desalt), about 20% tree fern pieces that I cut into roughly 1/2 to 1 inch squares, some charcoal, some perlite and some fir bark pieces like orchid growers like to use.  Before this complex mix I used just long-fiber sphagnum.  I think the plants like the more open nature of this new mix..

 

I only fertilize when they start growing new stems and leaves and again when they start making the tubers.

 

Frank

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Bonjour

 

have you try some spore sowing?

 

ROBBIN C MORAN  to the missouri botanical garden  made a very good article on potato fern.

 

S.brunei  is find on Costa rica -Panama-Colombia -Ecuador

 

S.bismarckii and S. tuberosa Ecuador and Peru (1100 to 2000m)

 

S.brifons  in amazonia  lowlands of Colombia,Ecuador-Peru (200 to 800m)

 

microgramma and solanopteris  are sister genera  not the same

 

microgramma : "lacks tubers, has narrowly lanceolate scales on the rhizomes, smooth or wartyspores and usually lacks hairs among the sporangia "

 

solanopteris :"tubers,small,round scales on the rhizomes, spinyspores,and slender club-shaped hairs among the sporangia "

 

jeff

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http://www.plantsystematics.org/imgs/robbin/re/Polypodiaceae_Microgramma_bifrons_38501.html

Here the fern expert Robbin Moran has labeled his own photo as Microgramma brunei http://tcf.bh.cornell.edu/imgs/robbin/r/Polypodiaceae_Microgramma_brunei_7585.html

Of course not everyone may accept Lellinger's classification, therefore thorough web searches should cover both 'generic' names.

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Hi all,

I think it does not really matter if one taxonomist places Solanopteris as an independent genus and another one as a subgenus of Microgramma. Frankly speaking, that's a matter of taste and as long as nobody does phylogenetic analysis both placements may have their pro and contra arguments.

BTW, the same holds true for Lecanopteris and Myrmecophila...

All the best

Andreas

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Lecanopteris and Myrmecophila????? Not so, that would create even more confusion. 

Myrmecophila Rolfe.

Type Myrmecophila tibicinis (Bateman) Robert Allen Rolfe published in Orchid Review 25, 1917.  Basionym Epidendrum tibicinis James Bateman published in Edwards's Botanical Register 24, 1838.  (Rolfe cited Schomburgkia tibicinis as its basionym in error.) They are still frequently referred to as Schomburgkia in the orchid trade. Etymology of Myrmecophila is based on the word myrmecophile (ant friend) derived from the Greek words 'myrmekos' ant and 'phileo' love as a friend.)  A myrmecophile is usually defined as an animal species that habitually shares the nest of an ant species; however, in this context it alludes to Myrmecophila being ant-friendly plants.  The name Myrmecophila was later duplicated for a genus of myrmecophyte ferns (now Lecanopteris) by Konrad Hermann Heinrich Christ (ex Nakai) when published in Botanical Magazine 43, 1929, thus creating much taxonomic confusion.

The genus was revised in 2003.  The currently accepted species are:

M. brysiana, (Lem.) G.C. Kennedy.

M. christinae, Carnevali & Gómez-Juárez.

M. galeottiana (A. Rich.) Rolfe.

M. grandiflora Carnevali, Tapia-Muñoz & I. Ramírez.

M. humboldtii (Rchb. f.) Rolfe.

M. thompsoniana (Rchb. f.) Rolfe. Cayman Island only

M. tibicinis(Bateman.) Rolfe.

M. wendlandii (Rchb. f.) G.C. Kennedy.

M x lagunae-guerrerae Carnevali, Ibarra. González & Tapia-Muñoz. A natural hybrid.

Source. http://lankesteriana.org/lankesteriana/Lankesteriana%20vol.%203.%202003/Lankesteriana%20N%207/Numeroporsecciones/14%20Carnevali%20et%20al.pdf

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Hello Derrick,
you are of cause correct.
What I meant is Myrmecopteris, not Myrmecophila....sorry for mixup...
All the best
Andreas

 

 

I understand your confusion, Andreas, because if some Lecanopteris were rattached to the genus Myrmecopteris, L. mirabilis is considered as a Myrmecophila !

http://www.theplantlist.org/tpl1.1/record/tro-26610500

But I think this name is illegitimate because in the Plantae Kingdom, a genus is also called Myrmecophila - as Derrick says.

Homonymy in genus is possible, but only for different kingdoms. Some plants and animals have for example the same genus, but we cannot made a mixup.

I don't understand why TPL consider that the valid name for Lecanopteris mirabilis is Myrmecophila mirabilis...

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Hi Andreas,

 

Back up at message #10 in this thread you asked what temperature I was growing my Solanopteris at. I told you low 60s F at night and estimated day time as no more than low 80s.  Since then I have put a thermometer in the growing chamber and I can now say with certainty that daytime temperatures are only 10 to 12 degrees above nighttime - low 70s.

 

Frank

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with  the new revision to B.Swale and M. Hassler  to 20-07-2001 

we speak just to Lecanopteris

 

Lecanopteris Reinwardt 1825

Myrmecophila cHRIST 1897

Myrmecopteris  Pichi Serm 1977

 

may be here also some anteriory problem?

 

perhaps a DNA analysis to decide is not a luxury !!!

 

jeff

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