Derrick

Squamellaria wilsonii

8 posts in this topic

Bonjour

 

MAGNIFIQUE  

 

I had seen these plants just  on drawings

 

have you seen ,may ,be a difference with a S.wilsonii   and have you seen  S.thekii

 

 

merci

 

jeff

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Bonjour

 

MAGNIFIQUE  

 

I had seen these plants just  on drawings

 

have you seen ,may ,be a difference with a S.wilsonii   and have you seen  S.thekii

 

 

merci

 

jeff

 

 

Yes, it is absolutely stunning to see these plants in color!

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Squamellaria imberbis (A. Gray) Beccari published in Malesia Raccolta 2, 1886. Synonym S. wilsonii (Horne ex Baker) Beccari Malesia Raccolta 2, 1886.  Basionym Hydnophytum wilsonii Horne ex Baker, published in Journal of the Linnean Society, Botany 20, 1883.

Tuber elongate-rotund growing horizontally to 30 cm long and approximately half that in diameter with a number of slim hydnophytum-like stems arising from the apex or nearby.  Colour glossy to matt black with scattered 2 cm spines mounted on small protrusions; small, rimmed entrance holes are most numerous on upper surfaces.  Stems several, branching, to 50 cm long.  Calyx pale green, corolla white.  Flowers and fruits have been obtained between May and December.

Habitats: Two reports. Often several specimens to a tree growing at altitudes of 300-700 m. (984-2297 ft.) on Vanua Levu and Taveuni Islands, Fiji.  Occurring in dense forest at elevations of 200-900 m. (656-2953 ft.)

Range: Endemic to Fiji: Vanua Levu and Taveuni Islands.  Records: Vanua Levu Island: Thakaundrove (Cakaudrove) Province: Mt. Kasi, Yanawai River region (16o 30’ S. 179o 19’ E. this is on the mid west side of Savusavu Bay on the south side.  Mathuata-Thakaundrove (Cakaudrove) Provincial boundary; Korotini Range near road from Savusavu to Lambasa.  Crest of Korotini Range, between Navitho Pass and Mt. Ndelaikoro.

Taveuni Island: Western slope 16o 48' S, 179o 58' E, between Wairiki on the north-west coast and Somosomo a little further north.  Slopes of Mt. Manuka, east of Wairiki and on wooded mountains on western slope a few kilometres northeast of Vuna Point.  On road to Des Voeux Peak.  Above Qacavulo (Nggathavula) Estate, Nggarawalu Freehold (now obsolete.)  Also Forest Creek ?an uncertain location.)

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OK , but in the "flora vitiensis nova "  we find  these 2   S.imberbis and wilsonii    in malesia 2  also.

 

S.imberbis : "epiphytic srub  with short branches arising from ant-inhabited tubers , sparingly know  at elevation up to 430m in dense forest , with white corollas , the only dated specimen  bore flowers and fruit in may ".

 

Huxley & Jebb  find some difference  but for they  due to developmental stages or the vagaries of drying .

 

where is the truth ? 

 

jeff

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There is only one species of Squamellaria known to inhabit both Vanua Levu and Taveuni Island.  That species is Squamellaria imberbis (A. Gray) Beccari published in Malesia Raccolta 2, 1886. Synonym S. wilsonii (Horne ex Baker) Beccari also in Malesia Raccolta 2, 1886.  Basionym Hydnophytum wilsonii Horne ex Baker, published in Journal of the Linnean Society, Botany 20, 1883.  Asa Gray's collections were made in the eighteen fifties and Beccari's publication for both 'species' was in 1886 with Horne ex Baker published in 1883 both about 30 years later; therefore, it seems evident that the name S. imberbis should have precedent. 

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Hi, complete novice here, would another ant species make use out of a vacant, developed, Squamellaria plant? If trained to use it could they be trained to work alongside the Fiji ants and create more homes while colonizing artificial environments? Finally, through slow stimulus could they be acclimated to survive any forest in North America? The article that brought me here said that maybe up to forty percent of the forests here are fertilized by ants. I like that.

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S.wilsonii was sunk by Jebb (1991) into S. imberbis. However, a 2016 Squamellaria revision by Chomicki et al., used morphology and molecular phylogenetics to re-seperate the two species. Therefore, S. wilsonii is now considered to be the species endemic to Taveuni island while the somewhat similar looking S.imberbis is endemic only to nearby Vanua Levu island. 

http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0151317

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